Venderán cartas del asesino de John Lennon

Defo Hoffman

 

Según informó la casa de subastas estadounidense Moments in Time, las cartas que enviara el asesino confeso del exbeatle, Mark David Chapman, al efectivo policial responsable de su arresto, en diciembre de 1980 en Nueva York saldrán a la venta por un valor de 75.000 dólares.

“Han estado en mi poder durante 30 años, ahora tengo 66 años, y me pregunto: qué voy a hacer con ellas? Así que decidí que podría venderlas”, afirmó Spiro a la cadena CNN.

En las citadas misivas, Chapman, que cumple condena en una prisión del estado de Nueva York, muestra amabilidad con Spiro y le pregunta insistentemente si ha leído la novela de J.D Salinger “The Catcher in the Rye”, ya que explicaría mucho de lo ocurrido la noche del crimen del famoso cantante.
Chapman, de 57 años, reitera que la novela de Salinger es su “declaración” tras el asesinato y señala misteriosamente que otros “podrían haber servido para el mismo propósito” que el exmiembro de los Beatles.

Las cartas datan de entre enero y mayo de 1983, dado que posteriormente Chapman no volvió a enviar más a Spiro, quien afirma que respondió a algunas de ellas.

El presidente de Moments in Time, Gary Zimet, anunció que también saldrá a la venta el vinilo “Double Fantasy”, publicado por Lennon y su esposa Yoko Ono en 1980, que cuenta con el autógrafo del músico dedicado a Chapman.

El disco tendrá un precio de salida de 650.000 dólares.

Cabe recordar que Chapman asesinó al músico británico el 8 de diciembre de 1980 ante las puertas de su residencia en el edificio Dakota, frente al Central Park de Nueva York, crimen por el que fue condenado a una pena de entre veinte años y cadena perpetua por el delito de asesinato en segundo grado.

Pese a sus continuas peticiones para que se decrete su libertad tras 31 años en prisión, la Junta de Libertad Condicional de Nueva York rechazó tal posibilidad por séptima vez en agosto de 2012.

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Top 10 Songs Inspired by Yoko Ono

Top 10 Songs Inspired by Yoko Ono

Yoko OnoKeystone, Getty ImagesThere’s more than a few songs inspired by Yoko Ono — one of the most celebrated and vilified figures in rock history.

After all, she was the muse for one of pop music’s biggest legends, John Lennon. And she was the scapegoat for the breakup of, arguably, the greatest band that ever existed — the Beatles. Her work has influenced Sonic Youth, Elvis Costello and Lady Gaga, but her music is also laughed off as shrill, shrieking and unlistenable. Even Yoko seems to understand how she is perceived. She’s written songs with the titles ‘Yes, I’m Your Angel’ and ‘Yes, I’m a Witch.’

No matter how you feel about Yoko Ono, she’s inspired some great music. Here are 10 songs that might not have existed without her.

LetItBe

10

‘Get Back’

The Beatles
From: ‘Let it Be’ (1970)

Paul McCartney’s ‘Get Back’ was recorded during the ‘Let it Be’ sessions, when tensions among the Beatles were at an all-time high. Although McCartney always denied it, Lennon felt that there was something nasty being stated about Yoko in the song, and said so in his infamous interview with ‘Playboy’ in 1980. There were also rumors that McCartney looked straight at Yoko every time he sang the words “get back” during the Fab Four’s 1969 rooftop concert. It’s not difficult to make the leap that one of Lennon’s bandmates would wish that the ever-present Yoko would “get back to where she once belonged.”

TheB-52'sTheB-52's

9

‘Rock Lobster’

The B-52’s
From: ‘The B-52’s’ (1979)

This new wave hit doesn’t mention Yoko in the lyrics, but takes some of its musical inspiration from Yoko’s singing style. Cindy Wilson’s screechy warbling was intended as a tribute. When Lennon heard the song, he got it right away – thrilled at hearing that his wife’s music had impacted others. John also credited the song for helping to make him want to record music again, resulting in his and Yoko’s ‘Double Fantasy’ album.

JohnLennon-albums-doublefantasy

8

‘Dear Yoko’

John Lennon
From: ‘Double Fantasy’ (1980)

Speaking of ‘Double Fantasy,’ this sweet, bouncy ode to Yoko can be found on that album. It’s a lovely little portrait of Lennon and Ono in middle age, in which John can’t even imagine doing the most mundane things without his soulmate by his side (“Even when I watch TV / there’s a hole where you’re supposed to be”). Lennon’s sunny tribute to their enduring love is made bittersweet by his murder, which occurred only three weeks after the album’s release.

dar-williams-the-green-world

7

‘I Won’t Be Your Yoko Ono’

Dar Williams
From: ‘The Green World’ (2000)

Folk singer Dar Williams uses John and Yoko as a starting point for exploring love, and particularly, love between artists. She wonders if Yoko ever considered staying solo and if she was worried that being associated with a Beatle would ruin her own art. And she gets in some wry lines, regarding Ono’s perceived duality – “I could sell your songs to Nike / and for all you know, that I could save your soul.” Ultimately, Yoko stands for devotion in the song. And Dar won’t be your Yoko Ono, if you’re not good enough for her.

Roger_Waters_Pros_Cons_HH

6

‘5:01 a.m. (The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, Part 10)’

From: ‘The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking’ (1984)

This single – from Roger Waters’ first post-Pink Floyd album – features the memories of a character named Reg. Waters said that Yoko Ono’s role in the lyrics came about because of drummer Andy Newmark’s dream (Newmark also played on ‘Double Fantasy’). It’s hardly the most flattering portrayal: Yoko encourages Reg to commit suicide. Before opting to stay alive, he asks, “Did you understand the music, Yoko? Or was it all in vain?” Dream or not, that’s pretty harsh. Eric Clapton’s bluesy guitar work softens the blow.

AnthologyJohnLennoncover

5

‘I’m Losing You’

John Lennon
From: ‘The John Lennon Anthology’ (1998)

Most fans would probably assume that ‘I’m Losing You’ was written during Lennon’s “lost weekend” phase when he was estranged from Yoko. Instead, it resulted from a time when John wasn’t able to phone his wife. Lennon would write plenty of love songs that worshipped Yoko, but here he sounds angry, sad and sick with desperation. It’s the ugly side of marital devotion. As such, the ideal version of this song is the raw, rocking original – which features Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen and Bun E. Carlos. Maybe it was a little too raw. ‘I’m Losing You’ was re-recorded for ‘Double Fantasy’; the superior first version of the song finally surfaced on ‘The John Lennon Anthology’ in the ’90s.

RamMcCartneyalbumcover

4

‘Too Many People’

Paul McCartney
From: ‘Ram’ (1971)

Not known for acerbic lyrics, McCartney instilled his anger about the Beatles breakup in ‘Too Many People.’ Paul was initially reluctant to cop to the barbs directed at Lennon and Ono, but he later admitted that lines such as “Too many people preaching practices” were about the outspoken couple. The song started out a little nastier – the line in the chorus originally went “Yoko took your lucky break and broke it in two.” Still, ‘Too Many People’ was pointed enough for Lennon to take notice and retaliate with ‘How Do You Sleep?’

ImagineCover

3

‘Oh Yoko!’

John Lennon
From: ‘Imagine’ (1971)

The ramshackle closer on the ‘Imagine’ album strips down love to its barest essentials. Lennon sings about calling for his wife when he’s in the middle of five different things. As on ‘Dear Yoko,’ years later, the song is about John needing his woman, no matter what he’s doing. The music was written a few years earlier, when the Beatles visited India, but went unrecorded until 1971. In all of the music that John recorded, did he ever sound as happy as he does on ‘Oh Yoko’?

Gordon-album

2

‘Be My Yoko Ono’

Barenaked Ladies
From: ‘Gordon’ (1992)

These clever Canadians crafted a pop-folk ditty that simultaneously mocks, blames, celebrates and exonerates Yoko Ono. On the one hand, the Ladies don’t blame her for breaking up the Beatles. On the other, the song contains “Oh no / Ono” puns, Yoko-esque shrieking and the line “If I were John and you were Yoko, I would gladly give up musical genius / just to have you as my very own, personal Venus.” It’s certainly the best Yoko Ono song written by people who don’t know her.

BalladOfJohnAndYoko

1

‘The Ballad of John and Yoko’

The Beatles
Single (1969)

This freewheeling chronicle of John and Yoko’s wedding and honeymoon was written by Lennon in a Paris hotel room – he called it “a piece of journalism.” The song combines the couple’s obvious joy with intermittent comments from the press. In a telling preview for how Yoko would be treated as a Beatle accessory for the rest of her life, the media express adulation, but also confusion, and then gripe about her influence on John. Although credited to the Beatles, ‘The Ballad’ only features two members: John and Paul. With Ringo Starr and George Harrison away and Lennon itching to record, the pair recorded all the parts in less than seven hours on April 14, 1969. It hit No. 1 that June.

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FUNNY AS HELL 

George Harrison Joins John Lennon and Paul McCartney 55 years ago

 

The BeatlesThe third part of the equation that would become the Beatles fell into place on Feb. 6, 1958. George Harrison joined the Quarry Men, the John Lennon-led group that Paul McCartney had joined as a second guitarist and singer the previous summer.

Harrison, who was a few weeks shy of his 15th birthday, had known McCartney for about a year. The two were students at the Liverpool Institute and frequently took the same bus to and from school. A friendship blossomed, and the two began jamming together, even after McCartney had moved from Speke to Allerton.

When the Quarry Men – named after the Quarry Bank High School where the band was formed the years earlier – were looking to bring in a third guitarist (they had the idea long before Lynyrd Skynyrd), McCartney suggested his friend. The audition took place, strangely enough, on the top of a double-decker bus. At McCartney’s prompt, Harrison took out his guitar and played Bill Justis’ R&B instrumental ‘Raunchy,’ a No. 2 hit on Sun Records in 1957.

Lennon was impressed with the note-perfect rendition. But the 17-year old Lennon, who was already at Liverpool Art College, had reservations about being in a group with such a youngster. As McCartney put it in ‘Anthology,’ “It seemed an awful lot at the time. If we wanted to do anything grown-up we worried about George looking young. We thought, ‘He doesn’t shave…can’t we get him to look like a grown-up?’”

Typically, Lennon, also in ‘Anthology,’ put it more bluntly. “George looked even younger than Paul — and Paul looked about 10, with his baby face.”

But Harrison’s skill was too good to overlook for Lennon who, despite leading a band was still very much a novice on his instrument, “We asked George to join because he knew more chords,’ he said. “We got a lot from him. Paul had a friend at school who would discover chords, and these would be passed ’round Liverpool. Every time we learnt a new chord, we’d write a song around it.”

Another advantage to having Harrison in the group was that his mother didn’t object to the boys coming over and rehearsing. In fact, she welcomed it and would often give the teenagers small glasses of whiskey.

Three of the pieces were now in place. Over the next four years they would try out different names and bandmates, honing their musical and songwriting chops all the while, before the unstoppable force that became known as the Beatles were unleashed upon the world.

John Lennon : Las cartas donde critica a Paul McCartney

En España se acaba de publicar el libro “Las cartas de John Lennon”, con más de 250 misivas y notas escritas del puño y letra del exbeatle, todas ellas ahora propiedad de su viuda Yoko Ono y recopiladas, contextualizadas y comentadas por Hunter Davies, quien es amigo y biógrafo oficial del extinto músico.

Los escritos antes mencionados entregan valiosa información sobre la vida del fundador de la legendaria banda, desde su infancia hasta los fuertes conflictos con los McCartney.

Espero que te des cuenta de toda la basura que tú y el resto de mis amables y desinteresados amigos han lanzado contra Yoko y contra mí desde que estamos juntos. Puede que a veces hayan sido un poco más sutiles o debería decir “clase media”, pero no muchas, cita una carta publicada.

En otra de ellas, le reclama haber convertido el grupo en una maquina de la industria musical.

lennon

No me avergüenzo  para nada de los Beatles (fui yo quien lo empezó), excepto de la basura que aceptamos para hacernos tan grandes. (…) ¿De verdad crees que la mayor parte del arte actual ha surgido debido a los Beatles? No creo que estés tan loco, Paul. Por supuesto que cambiamos el mundo, pero trata de llegar hasta el fondo”, confiesa Lennon.

 

John Lennon con Mick Jagger : Sus deseos para este 2013

John Lennon y Mick Jagger se conocieron en 1963, Lennon y Macca les brindaron el primer éxito relativo a los Rolling Stones ” I wanna be your man ” pero John fue soberbio con Mick y con todo el mundo, eso es obvio, ser provinciano en Londres le daba miedo sobretodo instigado por su manager  Brian Epstein y por el ABRUMADOR éxito de los Beatles mundialmente.

Igual en 1967 grabaron We Love You con Macca y Keith como soporte de los Stones en los coros como los Stones para All you need is Love.


Con el fundador de los Rolling Stones fue distinto Brian Jones era muy admiradao por Lennon , siempre lo respetó y lo llevó a grabar con los Beatles, pero Hendrix, eric Burdon, Jim Morrison, Nico, etc  etc  y demás estaban detrás de Brian por su talento y su natural cool, Brian falleció en 1969 y les dejo sobretodo a Keith Richards el sitio para que se desarrollara como Cool Keith y obvio con la ex novia de Brian, él las estrenaba –Jagger Y Richards agarraban mujer usada.

john and mick 3

En 1968 apareció en el Rock n Roll Circus de los Stones con la banda Dirty Mac : Eric Clapton, Keith y Mitch Mitchell es decir LA PRIMERA SUPER BANDA DE LA HISTORIA.

Después cuando Lennon dejó a la Ono y se fue a los Angeles ( The lost weekend ) con Bowie, Moon, Wood, Jagger – Richards, Alice Cooper, Marc Bolan y hasta una mimosa usada en la frente, grabó un tema con Jagger que es un gran cover “Too Many Cooks” Escucha acá


Al margen que Lennon habló medio mal de Jagger, Richards,Dylan etc, etc en varias entrevistas para medios másivos a lo mejor por ser muy inteligente líder y de paso como cualquier artista acomplejado -inseguro la embarró.

Lo mataron al mejor estilo de Carlitos way en 1980 : conspiración, fanatismo , que diablos lo fregaron en su comeback después de 5 años y con hijo que al paracer que sí quizo mucho a diferencia de Julian que no trató nada bien al Hey Jude, por ser muy muy joven, pensemos bien.

Imagine a better future for our sons and daughters

Espero que esta foto lisérgica  sea inspiradora .genios Lennon y Jagger que por cierto sigue en vigencia por atleta y esforzado…….

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IMAGINA un mundo que vaya a MEJOR para TODOS..